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Posts Tagged ‘demographic data’

Net Natural Decrease Approaching for Non-Hispanic Whites

Recent population estimates by age, race, gender and Hispanic origin for Maryland from the U.S. Census Bureau revealed that all of Maryland’s population growth in 2014, and indeed since 2010, was the result of the growth in minority populations, where minority is everyone other than non-Hispanic white alone.  Growth in Maryland was led by Hispanics, followed by African Americans, Asians and those of two or more races.  There was a decline in non-Hispanic whites due to net domestic outmigration.  (See Hispanics Continue to Lead Maryland’s Population Gain in 2014).

Percent of Non-Hispanic  White & Minority Births in Maryland

Percent of Non-Hispanic White & Minority Births in Maryland

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Non-Hispanic whites in Maryland make up a greater percentage of those eligible to vote than their share of the overall population, while all other races and Hispanic groups have smaller shares of the voter-eligible population. That finding comes from recently released data from the U.S. Census Bureau which estimates citizen voting age populations by non-Hispanic race and Hispanic origin.

Hispanics are an ethnic designation, not a racial designation, and can be any race.  They are not included in the race categories in order to avoid double counting. (more…)

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For all of you data junkies out there – as well as anyone who uses socioeconomic data for anything – are you getting tired of the assault on the American Community Survey (ACS) every year?

Logo of the American Community Survey, a proje...This May, it was taken to a new level when the House of Representatives first passed a bill making the ACS a voluntary survey, then deciding to eliminate the ACS completely the following week.  Making the ACS voluntary would decrease the participation rate to a level that would essentially (e.g. statistically) make the data worthless considering the already small sample size.  Only about 2.5 percent of the addresses in the nation receive the survey each year — hardly a tremendous burden on the American public. (more…)

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