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Posts Tagged ‘Baltimore City’

The overwhelming majority of Maryland’s population growth continues to occur in the four older suburban jurisdictions of Montgomery, Prince George’s, Anne Arundel and Baltimore counties, according to recently released population estimates for July 1, 2013 from the U.S. Bureau of the Census.[1]

Downtown Silver Spring in Montgomery County

Downtown Silver Spring in Montgomery County

The latest Census Bureau’s population estimates indicate that the effects of the Great Recession, which lasted from December 2007 to June 2009, and the collapse of the overheated housing market of the mid 2000s, are still being played out in the third year of the current decade.  Loss of jobs, followed by an anemic recovery, along with a housing market saddled with foreclosures and stricter mortgage loan standards, combined to greatly impact the ability of residents to move from current locations.  This reduced mobility had the greatest negative impact on rural/exurban counties in Western Maryland and on the Eastern Shore which in the past grew mostly from the migration of residents from other parts of Maryland.  The greatest positive impact was on the inner suburban counties, greatly reducing net out migration from the high levels experienced in the mid-2000s.

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As was reported in the Baltimore Sun, the Baltimore Business Journal and other news media last week, the U.S. Census Bureau released its annual population estimates for counties. The Maryland State Data Center released its tables and analyses on March 14, 2103. These can be found on the 2012 Population Estimates for Maryland’s Jurisdictions webpage.  The big news for Maryland was that Baltimore City is estimated to have grown by just over 1,100 residents (more…)

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Here are some of the highlights of a comparison of median household income estimates between 1999 (from the 2000 Census) and the single-year American Community Survey estimates over the 2006 thru 2011 period, which were released this morning by the U.S. Census Bureau.

The Great Recession, which lasted from December 2007 thru June 2009, and the subsequent slow recovery since that time, has had significant effects on median household income in Maryland.  For the State as a whole, median household income peaked in 2007 at $73,973, a rise of 3.7 percent from 1999 levels, but between 2007 and 2011 income declined by nearly $4,000 (-5.4%).  As a result, Maryland’s median household income in 2011 was nearly $1,400 (-1.9 percent) below the 1999 level.

Ten of the 16 jurisdictions for which there is data also had lower median household incomes in 2011 compared to 1999.  The largest percentage declines occurred in Wicomico (-10.8 percent), Cecil (-9.5 percent), Baltimore (-8.7 percent) and Allegany (-7.5 percent) counties.

In general, it has been the more rural or outlying suburban counties that have been hit the hardest by the Great Recession and the housing bust.  But there were also demographic changes that may have played a role in some of these income changes.  For example, Baltimore County, with the third-largest percentage decline in income since 1999, had the largest increase in the African-American population in the State between 2000 and 2010, while at the same time experienced the second largest decline in non-Hispanic whites (after Prince George’s County).  In general, incomes of African Americans and Hispanics are lower than those of non-Hispanic whites. (more…)

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These two maps depict the average annual population growth rates over two time periods – 2000 to 2006 and 2006 to 2011.  They also illustrate how the Great Recession and its aftermath affected Maryland. 

Of the 21 counties that experienced population growth during both time periods, 18 had a smaller growth rate in the 2006 to 2011 period, one grew about the same (Dorchester) and three grew at a greater annual rate in the 2006 to 2011 period.

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Caution should be used in analyzing the municipal population estimates just released by the U.S. Census Bureau. There are a few reasons to be careful in making comparisons. (more…)

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