Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘American Community Survey’

The Census Bureau recently announced plans to eliminate the American Community Survey (ACS) three-year socioeconomic estimates for all areas over 20,000 persons.  These estimates are often used to evaluate current and past socioeconomic conditions in medium sized communities and the loss of this data set would be a blow to doing important, timely analysis.

The Census Bureau collects data annually for all geographies, but because the ACS sample size is not large enough to provide single year data for all areas, the data are reported for one-year, three-year and five-year time periods.  (more…)

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Map: Total Number of Full and Part-Time Federal Workers by State - 2012

Map: Total Number of Full and Part-Time Federal Workers by State – 2012 (click to open large map)

While it is no secret that the partial shutdown of the federal government and the furloughing of federal workers will have a disproportionate effect on Maryland, Virginia and the District of Columbia, other states will also feel the effects. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Logo of the American Community Survey, a proje...

A Status Report on Maryland from the American Community Survey

Unemployment is down, income has stopped falling, more people have health insurance, and a smaller percentage of homeowners are “cost burdened.” That is some of the good news. But… unemployment remains stubbornly high for a recovery period, income is still well below pre‐recession levels and labor force participation continues to fall. That is some of the not so good news. (more…)

Read Full Post »

As a share of total state residents, Maryland’s foreign born population has grown over four-fold over the past 50 years.

MDP graphic design intern, Sol Moon, worked with Mark Goldstein to produce the following infographic to tell the story of this demographic using U.S. Census Bureau decennial count (1850–2000) and 2008–2010 American Community Survey data. The information contained in this infograhic was patterned after one that was done for the U.S. by the Census Bureau.

FB_Header (more…)

Read Full Post »

The 2009-2011 American Community Survey was made public today.  It is a massive amount of data that covers all geographies of 20,000 or more in population. In Maryland, that includes 62 places plus all the counties and Baltimore City.

Maryland is a very socioeconomically diverse state — and this data release reinforces that notion. For instance, of the 62 places for which there is data, the percent of the foreign-born by place varies from a high of 69.4 percent in Langley Park, Prince George’s County, to a low of 1.2 percent in Cumberland, in Allegany County.  Many of the places in Maryland with the highest foreign-born share have similar characteristics. For instance, the top five are all in either Prince George’s or Montgomery counties:

Langley Park (Prince George’s) 69.4%

Chillum (Prince George’s)  45.6

Wheaton (Montgomery) 44

Gaithersburg (Montgomery)  37.5

Silver Spring (Montgomery)  37.8

Maryland average  13.8

(more…)

Read Full Post »

Here are some of the highlights of a comparison of median household income estimates between 1999 (from the 2000 Census) and the single-year American Community Survey estimates over the 2006 thru 2011 period, which were released this morning by the U.S. Census Bureau.

The Great Recession, which lasted from December 2007 thru June 2009, and the subsequent slow recovery since that time, has had significant effects on median household income in Maryland.  For the State as a whole, median household income peaked in 2007 at $73,973, a rise of 3.7 percent from 1999 levels, but between 2007 and 2011 income declined by nearly $4,000 (-5.4%).  As a result, Maryland’s median household income in 2011 was nearly $1,400 (-1.9 percent) below the 1999 level.

Ten of the 16 jurisdictions for which there is data also had lower median household incomes in 2011 compared to 1999.  The largest percentage declines occurred in Wicomico (-10.8 percent), Cecil (-9.5 percent), Baltimore (-8.7 percent) and Allegany (-7.5 percent) counties.

In general, it has been the more rural or outlying suburban counties that have been hit the hardest by the Great Recession and the housing bust.  But there were also demographic changes that may have played a role in some of these income changes.  For example, Baltimore County, with the third-largest percentage decline in income since 1999, had the largest increase in the African-American population in the State between 2000 and 2010, while at the same time experienced the second largest decline in non-Hispanic whites (after Prince George’s County).  In general, incomes of African Americans and Hispanics are lower than those of non-Hispanic whites. (more…)

Read Full Post »

The American Community Survey (ACS) released this morning by the U.S. Census Bureau reveals a treasure trove of data about jurisdictions with populations of at least 65,000 people.  In Maryland, 16 jurisdictions meet that threshold, plus the state itself. The annual ACS report is derived from the U.S. Census Bureau’s nationwide monthly survey of 275,000 addresses covering demographic, social, economic and housing data. This report, which covers calendar year 2011, is a vital instrument to measure how far we have come since the Great Recession — and how far we have left to go to recover what was lost. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »