Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Demographic Trends’ Category

Non-Hispanic whites in Maryland make up a greater percentage of those eligible to vote than their share of the overall population, while all other races and Hispanic groups have smaller shares of the voter-eligible population. That finding comes from recently released data from the U.S. Census Bureau which estimates citizen voting age populations by non-Hispanic race and Hispanic origin.

Hispanics are an ethnic designation, not a racial designation, and can be any race.  They are not included in the race categories in order to avoid double counting. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Baltimore, Maryland Skyline from the Inner Harbor

Baltimore, Maryland Skyline from the Inner Harbor (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Maryland’s population grew by more than 111,000 between 2010 and 2012, mainly due to gains in minority groups, according to U.S. Census Bureau estimates released in June.

In fact, Maryland is moving closer to becoming a majority‐minority state, with its minority share reaching 46.1 percent in 2012. Maryland has the seventh highest minority share in the country, significantly exceeding the U.S. national average of 37 percent.

Population gains in Maryland over the last year were led by increases in the Hispanic population (more…)

Read Full Post »

An article from the Baltimore Sun (March 24, 2013) that analyzes the population changes for Maryland’s counties.

Recession changed course of population growth in metro Baltimore – baltimoresun.com. (more…)

Read Full Post »

The 2009-2011 American Community Survey was made public today.  It is a massive amount of data that covers all geographies of 20,000 or more in population. In Maryland, that includes 62 places plus all the counties and Baltimore City.

Maryland is a very socioeconomically diverse state — and this data release reinforces that notion. For instance, of the 62 places for which there is data, the percent of the foreign-born by place varies from a high of 69.4 percent in Langley Park, Prince George’s County, to a low of 1.2 percent in Cumberland, in Allegany County.  Many of the places in Maryland with the highest foreign-born share have similar characteristics. For instance, the top five are all in either Prince George’s or Montgomery counties:

Langley Park (Prince George’s) 69.4%

Chillum (Prince George’s)  45.6

Wheaton (Montgomery) 44

Gaithersburg (Montgomery)  37.5

Silver Spring (Montgomery)  37.8

Maryland average  13.8

(more…)

Read Full Post »

The Great Recession has had a profound effect on where population growth is taking place in Maryland.  The accompanying chart groups the annual share of Maryland population growth into three broad geographic categories: inner suburban counties, outer suburban counties and the more rural counties of Western Maryland and the Eastern Shore. (more…)

Read Full Post »

The Census Bureau just released a report on population change between 2000-2010 on Metropolitan and Micropolitan areas. The report shows that many large metropolitan areas have seen increases in people moving back near downtown areas.  Unfortunately, Baltimore and New Orleans were exceptions.  Baltimore lost 10,194 within two miles of City Hall.  Also of interest to Maryland, the Washington, D.C. area saw an increase of non-Hispanic white population near downtown while registering declines in non-Hispanic whites in the surrounding suburbs. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Here are some of the highlights of a comparison of median household income estimates between 1999 (from the 2000 Census) and the single-year American Community Survey estimates over the 2006 thru 2011 period, which were released this morning by the U.S. Census Bureau.

The Great Recession, which lasted from December 2007 thru June 2009, and the subsequent slow recovery since that time, has had significant effects on median household income in Maryland.  For the State as a whole, median household income peaked in 2007 at $73,973, a rise of 3.7 percent from 1999 levels, but between 2007 and 2011 income declined by nearly $4,000 (-5.4%).  As a result, Maryland’s median household income in 2011 was nearly $1,400 (-1.9 percent) below the 1999 level.

Ten of the 16 jurisdictions for which there is data also had lower median household incomes in 2011 compared to 1999.  The largest percentage declines occurred in Wicomico (-10.8 percent), Cecil (-9.5 percent), Baltimore (-8.7 percent) and Allegany (-7.5 percent) counties.

In general, it has been the more rural or outlying suburban counties that have been hit the hardest by the Great Recession and the housing bust.  But there were also demographic changes that may have played a role in some of these income changes.  For example, Baltimore County, with the third-largest percentage decline in income since 1999, had the largest increase in the African-American population in the State between 2000 and 2010, while at the same time experienced the second largest decline in non-Hispanic whites (after Prince George’s County).  In general, incomes of African Americans and Hispanics are lower than those of non-Hispanic whites. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »