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Archive for August, 2012

These two maps depict the average annual population growth rates over two time periods – 2000 to 2006 and 2006 to 2011.  They also illustrate how the Great Recession and its aftermath affected Maryland. 

Of the 21 counties that experienced population growth during both time periods, 18 had a smaller growth rate in the 2006 to 2011 period, one grew about the same (Dorchester) and three grew at a greater annual rate in the 2006 to 2011 period.

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One of the most profound impacts on interstate migration for the boom/bust period that began about a decade ago was the migration flow between Maryland and Pennsylvania.  Maryland had net population losses to Pennsylvania for 22 straight years through migration from 1989 to 2010, the latest data available.  That is, more residents of Maryland moved to Pennsylvania than vice versa.  And beginning around 2003, the outflow of Maryland residents to Pennsylvania began to pick up very substantially. (more…)

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Both Maryland and the nation are moving towards becoming majority-minority, where minorities make up more than 50 percent of the population. Minorities are defined as everyone other than “non-Hispanic white alone.” For Maryland as a whole, minorities make up 45.6 percent of the population, well above the overall U.S. rate of 36.6 percent and ranked seventh among the 50 states and the District of Columbia.

It is more than likely that Maryland will become a majority-minority state within the next 10 years. But even right now, Maryland is already majority-minority for almost every single age below 40. (more…)

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Two members of the Maryland Department of Planning weigh in on a recent article in the New York Times titled, “Why D.C. Is Doing So Well

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The growth in the share of multifamily units in Maryland has been striking since the mid-2000s housing bubble burst. Multi-family housing — generally, apartments — made up 38 percent of all residential permitted units in 2011. That was the highest level since the early 1970s and well above typical rates over the last three decades. (more…)

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For all of you data junkies out there – as well as anyone who uses socioeconomic data for anything – are you getting tired of the assault on the American Community Survey (ACS) every year?

Logo of the American Community Survey, a proje...This May, it was taken to a new level when the House of Representatives first passed a bill making the ACS a voluntary survey, then deciding to eliminate the ACS completely the following week.  Making the ACS voluntary would decrease the participation rate to a level that would essentially (e.g. statistically) make the data worthless considering the already small sample size.  Only about 2.5 percent of the addresses in the nation receive the survey each year — hardly a tremendous burden on the American public. (more…)

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My colleague John Coleman talks about the relationship between data, information and knowledge: How data is vital, but not so useful until it can be turned into information and then disseminated as knowledge. Our boss, the Secretary of Planning, Richard E. Hall, puts the process in more industrial terms: turning pig iron into steel into automobiles.

The point is: data is raw material. The public, government, business and other institutions receive enormous amounts of it every day. But the trick — in fact, often the line between success and failure — is the ability to make sense of it.

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